spacing graphic spacing graphic

spacing graphic
home
spacing graphic
program
spacing graphic
speakers
spacing graphic
register
spacing graphic
hosts
spacing graphic
venue
spacing graphic
The Future of Life logo
spacing graphic
program
spacing graphic 7:30 am — 8:15 am
BREAKFAST
WITH TIME EDITORS - Group A
Participants will be invited to breakfast with TIME editors on either Thursday (Group A) or Friday (Group B). Assignments will be made at Wednesday's conference registration. Group A participants should go to the Doubletree Hotel, Level 3, Cottonwood, Redwood and Ironwood rooms. Group B is invited to continental breakfast in the Monterey Conference Center, Steinbeck Foyer.

8:30 am — 9:00 am
Monterey Conference Center - Steinbeck Forum

BIG QUESTIONS•BIG THINKERS•PROVOCATIONS: PART 2
Speakers:
Bill Joy, Chief Scientist and Corporate Executive Officer,
Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Bartha M. Knoppers, Professor of Law ,
University of Montreal
Larry Smarr, Director,
California Institute of Telecommunications and Information Technology
Nancy S. Wexler, Higgins Professor of Neuropsychology,
Columbia University

9:00 am — 9:45 am
Steinbeck Forum

DESIGNER BABIES, CLONES, GENE THERAPY—WHAT'S AT STAKE?
Would-be parents can now choose their baby's sex, hair color, athletic prowess and to some extent I.Q. But should they? Intervening to prevent disease is one thing, but designing better babies is another. Should the restrictions on human cloning or germ line intervention be lifted? Panelists will explore the latest ethical, moral, social, and economic arguments.
Panelists:
Paul Gelsinger, Vice President,
CIRCARE
Jonathan Glover, Professor of Ethics,
King's College, University of London
Dean H. Hamer, Chief, Gene Structure and Regulation Section
National Cancer Institute, National Institutesof Health

Moderator:
Michael D. Lemonick, Senior Writer,
TIME Magazine


9:45 am — 10:45 am
Steinbeck Forum

MAKING MONEY: IF GENETICS IS A GOLDMINE, WHERE IS ALL THE GOLD?
Today, a single chip can screen for more than 60,000 genetic conditions. Many drugs, seeds, plants, and animals derived from biotechnologies are commercially available, yet only a handful of biotech startups make any money. Is genomics really the next big thing? What are the realistic expectations for the business of biotech? If the pace of technological progress continues to double every decade, what products and services might we anticipate in 2005, 2010, 2015? How will businesses, education, healthcare, and other aspects of life be affected?
Panelists:
G. Steven Burrill, Chief Executive Officer,
Burrill and Company
Juan Enriquez, Director,
Life Sciences Project, Harvard Business School
Maykin Ho, Managing Director,
Goldman Sachs & Co., Inc.
Gengxi Hu, Professor,
Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
& CEO, Shanghai Health Digit Ltd.
Caroline A. Kovac, General Manager,
IBM Life Sciences

Moderator:
Steve T. Jurvetson, Managing Director,
Draper Fisher Jurvetson

10:45 am — 11:15 am

Break



11:15 am — 11:35 am
Steinbeck Forum

THE CASE FOR OPTIMISM
Are we optimists or pessimists? Author Matt Ridley is an optimist, citing how often bad things predicted from science, especially bioscience, keep failing to come to pass. For example, Genetic engineering of microbes was thought to be dangerous (Asilomar). GM of plants was thought to be bad for the environment yet it keeps being good for it. Behavior genetics was thought to be going to lead to complacency about failure but the opposite is true‹proving autism is genetic has been accompanied by new therapy and intervention. Even the specter of insurance discrimination based on genetics is proving illusory, more of a problem for the industry than the individual. Meanwhile, genetics has proved that races are skin deep, an unexpected bonus for social policy. TIME Senior Science Editor Phil Elmer-Dewitt will challenge Ridley to make his case and why it matters.
Provocateur:
Matt White Ridley, Author,
Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters


Moderator:
Phil Elmer-Dewitt, Senior Science Editor,
TIME Magazine

11:35 pm — 12:30 pm
Steinbeck Forum

WHEN MORALITY AND SCIENCE COLLIDE—THE CASE OF STEM CELL RESEARCH
What happens when one man's morality supersedes another man's science, or vice versa? Case in point: stem cells. What was once promised as the cure-all for a slew of ailments is now the subject of intense legal and ethical debate. How does a society sort through the moral implications of scientific progress? Is it inherently immoral to tinker with the natural life span and the nature of human life? Where have societies found the right balance? In this session, experts will discuss what we've learned about compromise and consequences, and how it might apply to future decision-making.
Panelists:
Daniel Callahan, Director of International Programs,
The Hastings Center
John Gearhart, C. Michael Armstrong Professor of Medicine,
Institute of Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins Medicine
Alfonso Gomez-Lobo, Ryan Professor of Metaphysics and Moral Philosophy,
Georgetown University
and Member, President's Council on Bioethics
Wise Young, Director,
W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience, Rutgers University

Moderator:
Michael Kinsley, Writer,
Founding Editor, Slate,
and Contributing Writer
TIME Magazine



12:30 pm — 1:45 pm
Doubletree Hotel - Lobby Level - DeAnza Ballroom

LUNCH

Groups will form. Discussions will roar.

1:45 am — 2:30 pm
Monterey Conference Center - Steinbeck Forum

WHO DECIDES?
As we learn more about our genetic configuration, we face increasingly complex individual questions and options. Who should have access to your genetic information and who should not? The police? Insurers? Marketers? Your employer? Once your genes are in a databank, can they ever be withdrawn? Should there be international protocols for sharing genomic data to broaden the benefit of new knowledge? Is privacy a lost cause?
Panelists:
Bartha M. Knoppers, Professor of Law,
University of Montreal
Edison Liu, Executive Director,
The Genome Institute of Singapore
Nancy S. Wexler, Higgins Professor of Neuropsychology,
Columbia University

Moderator:
Catherine Crier, Host,
Court TV
and Author, The Case Against Lawyers


2:30 pm — 3:25 pm
Steinbeck Forum

THE POLITICS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD
Genetically engineered food, we were told, would trigger a new green revolution, solve the hunger problem and feed the world. Today, more than 50 million hectares are planted with genetically modified crops, yet rather than solving the world's problems, these plants have become the focus of a raging debate. GM food is a political hot potato in Europe. In Africa, governments whose people face starvation have refused delivery of American grain. Monsanto, which invested heavily in the technology, is now backing off. What is wrong with GM food? Is the problem with its critics? Its proponents? Can we separate politics from food?
Panelists:
Donald M. Bruce, Director,
The Society, Religion and Technology Project, Church of Scotland
Brian Halweil, Senior Researcher,
Worldwatch Institute
Ingo Potrykus, Professor Emeritus of Plant Sciences,
Institute of Plant Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology
Marc Van Montagu, Chairman,
Institute for Biotechnology for Developing Countries,
Department of Molecular Genetics, Ghent University

Moderator:
Amb. Cynthia Schneider, Associate Professor, Art History
Georgetown University



3:25 pm — 3:40 pm

Break


3:40 pm — 4:30 pm
Steinbeck Forum

AND WHAT ABOUT THE OTHER 9,999,999 SPECIES?
Experts estimate there are about 10 million species on the planet. Most discussion focuses on just one—humans. Scientists who study plants and insects say that the future of our species is intimately tied to all the others. How do we balance the needs of our species with all the others? What is lost when a species disappears? Does LIFE have a future?
Panelists:
Thomas Lovejoy, President,
The H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment
Ryan Phelan, Co-Founder,
All Species Inventory
Edward O. Wilson, Pellegrino University Research Professor and Honorary Curator in Entomology,
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Co-Moderators:
Stewart Brand, Co-founder,
All Species Inventory
Paul Saffo, Director and Roy Amara Fellow
Institute for the Future

4:30 pm — 5:30 pm
Doubletree Hotel - Level 3

BREAKOUT DISCUSSIONS: ISSUES IN-DEPTH
(participants choose one)
The molecular revolution will influence everything from how you choose your doctor to how you structure your financial portfolio. In these breakout discussions, participants can dig deeper into issues that concern them most.

Medical breakthroughs

Cottonwood I & II

Experts will lead a discussion about new treatments—and perhaps even cures—for AIDS, cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, addictions, and other diseases.
Speakers:
Dean H. Hamer, Chief, Gene Structure and Regulation Section,
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
Nancy Hopkins, Professor of Molecular Biology,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Rudolph Tanzi, Professor of Neurology,
Harvard Medical School, and Director, Genetics and Aging Research Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital

Moderator:
Christine Gorman, Senior Writer,
TIME Magazine



Bio meets business

Redwood I

Fortune Global 500 companies, the U.S. Marine Corps, and an array of start-ups are adapting marketing, manufacturing, and human resources to mirror the DNA-driven processes found in nature. In this session, experts and practitioners will talk about how genetic science is changing the way companies lead, sell, coach, and organize.
Speakers:
Stan Davis, Author and Consultant
Christopher Meyer, Vice President, Cap Gemini Ernst and Young
& Director, Center for Business Innovation
Lt. Gen. Paul Van Riper, (USMC retired)



Citizens' rights, privacy, and intellectual property

Ironwood I

Who owns your genes? When your DNA is analyzed at a lab, has your privacy been compromised? Should everyone's DNA be on file with the government for identification purposes? Is this the next big battleground for lawyers?
Panelists:
Gary A. Cohen, Vice President, Ethics and Corporate Responsibility
Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Q. Todd Dickinson, Partner,
Howrey Simon Arnold & White
Kate H. Murashige, Partner,
Morrison & Foerster

Moderator:
Paul Saffo, Director and Roy Amara Fellow,
Institute for the Future



How current are our classrooms?

Montery Conference Center - Steinbeck Forum


Video of this session is availble for viewing here.
This video uses Real Player which can be downloaded here.

The rate of change spurred by new discoveries and innovative applications in the life sciences has outpaced our schools and public knowledge. How can the education system cope with this? How are teachers incorporating (or not) new perspectives into their curricula? What role can informal education play? How do we keep the next generation of scientists and science enthusiasts curious?
Panelists:
Francis S. Collins, Director,
National Human Genome Research Institute,
National Institutes of Health
Richard Dawkins, Simonyi Professor For The Public Understanding of Science,
University of Oxford
John Gage, Chief Researcher and Director of the Science Office,
Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Chrysi Notskas, Director of Research in Mathematics and Science,
Half Hollow Hills School District
Dr. John Utting, Teacher,
Advanced Placement Biology
Stuyvesant High School

Moderator:
Robert Semper, Executive Associate Director,
Exploratorium

Introduction:
Eileen Naughton, President,
TIME Magazine



5:30 pm — 6:00 pm
Montery Conference Center - Future of Life Bookstore

Meet the Authors

6:00 pm — 7:00 pm

Free time

7:00 pm — 9:30 pm
Doubletree Hotel - Lobby Level - DeAnza Ballroom

RECEPTION, DINNER
AND MEDIA PANEL
Welcome Remarks:
Mark Tercek, Managing Director,
and Global Head of Healthcare and Consumer Retail Investment Banking
Goldman Sachs

ATTACK OF THE KILLER TOMATO
Whether it's the announcement of human cloning or the coverage of the threat of an anthrax outbreak, the media guides public opinion on stem cells, cloning, genetically modified food, etc. A panel of media leaders face a firing line.
Panelists:
Paula Apsell, Executive Producer,
NOVA
Catherine Crier, Host,
Court TV
and Author, The Case Against Lawyers
Philip Elmer-Dewitt, Senior Science Editor,
TIME Magazine
Christine Gorman, Senior Writer,
TIME Magazine
Kevin Kelly, Editor-at-Large,
Wired Magazine
Robert Krulwich, Nework Correspondent,
ABC NEWS
Michael Lemonick, Senior Writer,
TIME Magazine
Michael Specter, The New Yorker